Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 49
  1. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shoreham, West Sussex
    Posts
    5
    Hi I completed my first 100km on Saturday as have a few training rides prior to RideLondon 100 in August. The middle 30 miles were relentless hills and I really struggled which was a good indicator of my weaknesses and what I need to work on for London, but I also think I am doing my gears wrong, I know I should change down early and spin on the first part until the tension catches up, but when I take the pressure off ie stop peddling to change down I lose so much speed and then barely get anywhere up the hill. I managed to pace and ride up some but did have to get off and walk also. Distance isn't an issue but hills really are. Help what am I doing wrong?

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NE London
    Posts
    96
    @Kas - check this article out: http://easycycling.com/how-to-climb-...n-a-bike-fast/ It helped me a lot and my climbing has improved loads.
    strava: http://www.strava.com/athletes/lhulme

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    159
    Kas, do you actually stop pedalling to change gear? You should keep pedalling through, but also try and get in a much lower gear than you need at the start of the hill if changing gears is a problem for you, and then decrease your cadence as you go up if you cannot maintain the same pace. Just try and take it easier until your muscles adjust and pace yourself slowly, even if it feels like you are not moving. The key to being good at hills is doing lots of hills unfortunately. Also, which do you feel gives out first? your lungs or your legs? If your lungs cope better than your legs then you definitely need to maintain a really low gear and high cadence.
    Twitter: @cyclosally
    http://www.strava.com/athletes/sallymcsorley

  4. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    NE London
    Posts
    96
    Quote Originally Posted by Sally View Post
    Kas, do you actually stop pedalling to change gear? You should keep pedalling through, but also try and get in a much lower gear than you need at the start of the hill if changing gears is a problem for you, and then decrease your cadence as you go up if you cannot maintain the same pace. Just try and take it easier until your muscles adjust and pace yourself slowly, even if it feels like you are not moving. The key to being good at hills is doing lots of hills unfortunately. Also, which do you feel gives out first? your lungs or your legs? If your lungs cope better than your legs then you definitely need to maintain a really low gear and high cadence.
    What if you're in your lowest gear and your legs are still dying?! I suspect I may have to stop trying to climb 20%ers on a compact chainset -OR- toughen up!
    strava: http://www.strava.com/athletes/lhulme

  5. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shoreham, West Sussex
    Posts
    5
    Hi Thank you Catcake I'll definitely have a read of that article. Thank you Sally I think that maybe the problem, I am changing down in cadence too soon and yes I stop pedalling on doing so as it feels the chain is going to break. Its definitely my legs that are suffering and feel I need a lot better leg strength, although I didn't cramp up or ache as much as I thought I would after finishing the 100km on saturday. I do think I have developed tourettes during hill climbing but thats a different matter!!! lol

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    159
    Hi Kas, I know you mean about feeling like the chain will break, but actually you need to keep pedalling when shifting gears because derailleurs cannot work properly unless the chain is moving. If you keep pedalling it should make gear changes a bit easier and smoother. I read an article recently (but cannot remember where I read it), that said the optimum cadence on hills to make them as easy on yourself and the bike as possible is 90 to 100 rotations per minute, which is pretty high, so the faster you are pedalling and in as easy a gear as possible, the better

    Also, just do lots of hills. I quite enjoy the challenge of hills now, but I started out exactly the same as you and often had to get off half way up steep hills because my legs just did not have the power. I just forced myself to do lots of hils, but also took them really slowly and told myself that is was ok to be going so slow that it felt like I was almost not moving. You will soon find the muscles in your legs building and you will start getting a little faster. I don't think it ever gets that much easier, hills will always feel hard on the legs, but the pain will be less and the speed will be greater over time

    Oh, just noticed you are in Sussex too! No wonder you find the hills tough, we have some nasty hills around us!
    Twitter: @cyclosally
    http://www.strava.com/athletes/sallymcsorley

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Sussex
    Posts
    159
    Oh also, I think it might be mentioned in the fab article that Laura sent, but if you are losing speed and motion when changing gear up the hills, then start out in the easiest gear at the bottom of the hill so that you do not have to change gear at any point on the hill on the way up. This may mean going into the hill at a slowish pace, but if it helps improve your stamina and climbing ability on the hill itself then its worth trying.
    Twitter: @cyclosally
    http://www.strava.com/athletes/sallymcsorley

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shoreham, West Sussex
    Posts
    5
    Thanks everyone for all help and advice, and yes Sally there are certainly plenty of hills to practice on in Sussex, I do a 12 mile loop when I only have an hour to spare but also trying to fit in longer rides when I can, which is tough as I work 13 hour shifts so my training plan is somewhat all over the place. Still, I got up a hill today that a few months ago I had to walk up so there is definitely some progress, hopefully the next couple of months will get me ready for London and 'Box Hill'!!!

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    south essex
    Posts
    33
    Kas,
    try using strava to find out the % hill ascents around where you live, try and do some practise up some easy ones, if the percentage incline changes while your climbing then you need a different technique for each section, treat it as a different climb. practise on the small hills, small percentage increases, this is a fav of mine for reps http://app.strava.com/segments/3495249

    i've got a 9% by me that twists as well, almost like a chicane, its only about .2 mile long, but its like 5 different gradients over that .2 mile distance, so I almost need 5 different techniques to climb it successfully, this maybe an extreme, http://app.strava.com/segments/1187038 but the same applies to any climb, if the gradient is consistent, then one technique will suffice.

    I've learnt a lot from mountain biking, toughest near me is 10.6% offroad, so that needs a whole different technique with little grip. http://app.strava.com/segments/2503906

    hope that helps, early morning are good if your plagued by traffic, if you need to practise/ do reps etc.. good luck

  10. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Carfin, United Kingdom
    Posts
    15
    Hills are something you definitely get better at with practise. I don't like to immediately drop into my easiest gear, I like to know in my head that I have somewhere to go . i also prefer to sit down, i find it takes too much out of my legs, when i do have to hit the saddle again i'm spent. Better for me to think of big circles and grind it out.
    Lately the tune "whats goes up, must go down" is what gets stuck in my head. Drives me barmy on a long hill.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •